How should we do justice?

I’ve mentioned Tim Keller’s “Generous Justice” before. Today I’d like to underline a practical and theological issue about “how.”  Keller tells us about Abraham Kuyper, a Dutch theologian and statesman who ‘remade the churches into voluntary institutions’ in Holland over a century ago.  According to Kuyper, the church was both and organism and an institution … Continue reading How should we do justice?

Medical Missions, an assessment by a historian

Christoffer Grundmann writes, “Most nineteenth-century people, medics and theologians alike, paid little, if any attention to medical missions — even if they were addressing mission. And when they did, they almost always did so in very limited confines, leaving their discussions to circles of experts. This isolation made it even more difficult for any general … Continue reading Medical Missions, an assessment by a historian

The Work of the New York Medical Missionary Society

I was recently at a meeting where the idea of a medical missions institute was proposed, in order to enable our healthcare missionaries to better flourish in their international settings.  In fact over 65 different agencies send out missionaries from America; if we add Canadians, Indians, Australians, Nigerians, British, South Africans, etc the number of … Continue reading The Work of the New York Medical Missionary Society

An Upside down World. Distinguishing between home and mission field no longer makes sense. Christopher J.H. Wright

Chris Wright is the international director of the Langham Partnership.  He wrote “The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible’s Grand Narrative (Intervarsity, 2006). This CT article highlights the changes in Global Christianity, where the “old peripheries are now the center.”  He speaks of our “blindness to the ways Western Christianity is infected by cultural idolatry.”  … Continue reading An Upside down World. Distinguishing between home and mission field no longer makes sense. Christopher J.H. Wright

Seeking the welfare of your captors

God removed His people from Jerusalem because of their sin, yet He wants them to seek the welfare of their captors, the fierce Babylonians. “Welfare” in the Lord’s command is the translation of the Hebrew word, “shalom.” Rather than retaliate in anger, or put their hopes on a swift return to Jerusalem (predicted by false … Continue reading Seeking the welfare of your captors

Due credit to missionaries – from the Lancet Global Health Blog

An overlooked WWI legacy: maternal and child health in sub-Saharan Africa — from the Lancet Global Health Blog, November 2014 While medical missions provided 25-50% of maternal and child health care in sub-Saharan Africa throughout most of the 20th century, their legacy is often overlooked. Often incorporating local knowledge and culture, missionaries provided family-centered health care … Continue reading Due credit to missionaries – from the Lancet Global Health Blog